New Original Exhibition Tracing the Native American Fine Art Movement Opens October 26 at the Heard Museum

The new exhibit coming to The Heard Museum examines the story of an artistic movement often left out of the broader story of American art. Remembering the Future: 100 Years of Inspiring Art reflects 100 years of Indigenous creative expression and elevates the artists who have been central to the Native American Fine Art Movement.

Opening on Oct. 26, 2021, Remembering the Future: 100 Years of Inspiring Art showcases paintings, photography, sculpture and digital works of art produced by leading American Indian artists of the 20th and 21st centuries. The exhibition includes 75 works of art drawn from the Heard’s permanent collection. Within the selection, viewers find progression of ideas defining a major artistic movement that began in the early 20th century. Early works featured in the exhibition are by artists including Fred Kabotie (Hopi), Tonita Peña (San Ildefonso Pueblo) and Carl Sweezy (Southern Arapaho). The most recent include 21st century works by Kent Monkman (Cree), Tanya Lukin Linklater (Alutiiq) and Steven J. Yazzie (Navajo). The exhibition offers visitors a reminder of the many contributions that Indigenous artists have made to American art. Additionally displaying the powerful ways that art can inspire and help us to better understand the world we share.

“Remembering the Future celebrates a century of brilliant and dazzling Indigenous creative expression and is a visual testament to the Native American Fine Art Movement. Which has been largely overlooked by museums and art historians,” says David M. Roche, Dickey Family Director & CEO of the Heard Museum. “There has never been a more critical moment than right now for museums to be thinking about the future. We are remembering the important contributions these Indigenous artists have made to cultures beyond their own.”

Presented in the Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust Grand Gallery, Remembering the Future is curated by Diana Pardue, chief curator, and Dr. Ann Marshall, director of research. The  meaningful depth of perspective and certitude, that in remembering the history of American Indian art, the Heard Museum is also remembering the future.